May

8

Cache Road Liquor emailed us recently to let us know they featured Flying Dog Brewery in their recent newsletter.  Here’s what they wrote:

“The People’s Republic of Flying Dog is now in session. It’s happy hour at Flying Dog Brewery, so here is your latest dose of irreverence.” That’s how every issue of the Flying Dog Newsletter starts out and they are not kidding. Irreverence is definitely the operative word for their newsletter, website, and company. This is a beer company that fought a four year long court battle to get Ralph Steadman’s original artwork onto their bottles and eventually won the lawsuit so that now their bottles read, “Good Beer. No Shit.” This is a beer company that embraces the “Gonzo Spirit” embodied by Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas author Hunter S. Thompson, a man that had his remains shot out of a 153 foot Fist Statue, that’s 2 feet higher than the Statue of Liberty. This is a beer company that continually advocates guns, alcohol and blowing stuff up, three of our favorite things. This is a beer company that was dreamed up when founders George Stranahan and Richard McIntyre were out camping in the Himalayas with a mule and enough drugs to pacify a herd of elephants when they saw, what they swear was a flying dog. They promptly went home to the Woody Creek tavern and started a beer company. This beer is excellent, this company rocks, and you really should check it out at www.flyingdogales.com. 

Thanks guys!  Next time we roll thru Oklahoma, we’ll make sure to stop by.

Cache Road Liquor is at 2002 NW Cache Road, Lawton, OK 73505

[tags]cache road liquor, flying dog, craft beer, brewery[/tags]

May

6

We came across a great, new online video show called Beer Utopia.  They’re up to episode 6 and, wouldn’t you know it, they reviewed our Doggie-style Classic Pale Ale.  Click the image below to go to their website and check out the show.  They do a really nice job with it.

Beer Utopia

[tags]flying dog, doggie-style, pale ale, beer utopia, craft beer, review, brewery[/tags]

May

6

As spring fades away, our patio at the brewery is starting to get some serious hop growth. Our resident horticulturist, Jim Lutz has us set for quite the harvest. We will use the hops in some pilot batches this fall that will hopefully be available through our tasting room. Come take a tour and check things out Saturdays at 1:30. Full tour details available here.

Hops

[tags]hops. flying dog, brewery, beer, craft beer[/tags]

May

5

Kerberos Tripel Bottle Shot

Kerberos Tripel is the newest addition to our Flying Dog “litter of ales” as it joins our highly acclaimed Canis Major Series.

Kerberos Tripel is a bottle conditioned, strong Belgian-style ale with a slightly hazy appearance and mousse-like head.  It is brewed with Golding and Saaz hops and Pilsner and Aromatic malts to yield a medium body and champagne-like carbonation.  Kerberos pairs perfectly with Turkey and other poultry, creamy cheeses, fruit pastries, desserts and crème brulee.

Head Brewer, Matt Brophy said, “Extensive pilot system brewing allowed us to experiment with a variety of recipes and yeast strains. We ended up with a strong Belgian Ale that starts off sweet up front, fruity in the middle and has a really nice dry finish.”

Look for Kerberos to be hitting the shelves here in the next few weeks.  It will be available in 4-packs, full cases and on draft.  As always, if you’re having trouble finding it, email us or ask you your favorite store to pick it up.

[tags]kerberos, tripel, belgian-style ale, flying dog, canis major, extreme beer, craft[/tags]

May

2

The SessionThis month’s Session topic is “How it all started for you” – so we decided to go back in the Flying Dog Productions archives and pull out this interview with our Founders and Owners, George Stranahan and Richard McIntyre.

George and Richard originally started Flying Dog as a brewpub in Aspen, CO in 1990.  It was the first brewery in Aspen in over 100 years.  The brewpub was the culmination of a life-long dream for George, who decided he wanted to be in the beer business since his first swig of Budweiser when he was 12 years old.  It was also the realization of a vision George had after a mountain climbing adventure up K2, seven years before, in 1983.  After George and his group finished their expedition, they found themselves in a Pakistani tavern where George found a painting on the wall of a dog bounding through the air.  To George, the dog looked like it was flying.

That “Flying Dog” became the icon of their trip.  George’s take was that this dog could fly because he didn’t know any better and they climbed K2 because they didn’t know any better.  Years later, when it came time to name their brewpub it only made sense to call it “Flying Dog” – they didn’t know how to open and operate a brewpub.  But then again, they didn’t know any better.

[tags]flying dog, the session, may, brewery, craft beer, george stranahan, richard mcintyre[/tags]

Apr

25

Today is Arbor Day, so get outside and plant a tree.  Grad a 6-pack of your favorite Flying Dog style, someone to help dig a hole and make an event of it.  Get them to do the digging and you do the drinking.

Did you know that every state has their own date for Arbor Day?  Click here to see when your state celebrates tree planting day.  And, don’t forget that 6-pack.

[tags]arbor day, flying dog, brewery, craft, beer[/tags]

Apr

21

Fellow members of the People’s Republic of Flying Dog, I bring good tidings. This past weekend, the bi-yearly World Beer Cup was held in San Diego  Just under 3,000 beers from around the world were entered in 91 categories, and Flying Dog Brewery was recognized with two medals:

Gonzo Imperial Porter – Gold Medal, Imperial Stout Category
Old Scratch Amber Lager – Silver Medal, Amber Lager Category

Our Wild Goose Brewery also received a Gold Medal in the English Style IPA category for Wild Goose IPA.

Here’s a picture of our Production Team, Matt Brophy, Bob Malone and Mark Matovich with the awards.  The guy not holding an award is from the Marketing Dept and just trying to take some of the glory.

World Beer Cup Awards

We’re pleased as punch for the recognition, and are honored to win such prestigious awards. We’d also like to thank you, our loyal drinkers, for lapping up Flying Dog ales for the last 18 years. We couldn’t be where we are today without you guys (and gals).

[tags]world beer cup, flying dog, craft brewers conference, awards, gonzo imperial porter, old scratch[/tags]

Apr

14

Drivers beware.  There’s a new dog on the road.

The crew at Sanders Distributing in Taneytown, MD shows off their new Flying Dog delivery truck.

The Sanders Distributing Crew

If you happen to see this truck on the road:

  1. Get out of the way.
  2. Follow it and buy some Flying Dog.

[tags]flying dog, beer, delivery truck, sanders distributing[/tags]

Apr

10

Did you know that we offer a handy Beer Chart on our website that offers a ton of information on our entire “litter of ales”?  It makes for a great companion to our Mixed Pack when you’re trying a variety of different beers.

The beer chart offers the following information on each individual beer:

  • Hop and Specialty Malts
  • Awards
  • Availability
  • Flavor Profile
  • Brewing Process
  • Food Pairings
  • Color
  • IBU
  • ABV

To download, just log on to our website and click on any of the brand profile pages.  Just click on the link near the bottom of the bottle to download the pdf.

IHW Screen Capture

[tags]flying dog, ales, beer, brewery, craft beer, beer information, info[/tags]

Apr

9

One of the things we like about Flying Dog drinkers is that you like to voice your opinion and aren’t afraid to ask questions.  One of the questions that has been raised recently is, “Why does my Flying Dog beer cost more all of the sudden?”

Good question and I’ll try to answer it as best I can.

First, I’d like to first emphasize that although we have some degree of control over our pricing, but some of it depends on the independent distributor’s margin requirements and the retail/tax structure of a given state.  With that being the case, a price increase in one state could translate to $0.50 per case more per sixer, while in another it could be $2, even though we gave similar price increases to all of our distributors.  We structured our price increases to translate to $0.50-$1 more per 6-pack, but distributors and retailers are independent businesses and legally we have no control over their pricing.

OK, now to the meat of the question.  In the past 6 months, the price of malt and hops has increased dramatically worldwide and this is impacting ALL BREWERS GLOBALLY.  Because we, and most other craft brewers use more malt and hops in their beers relative to the bland, mass produced lagers, these prices have had a greater impact on brewers of flavorful beers.  In a nutshell it breaks down like this:

Malt

  • Crop failures due to weather conditions in major growing regions in the world (Australia’s 5 year drought, Europe’s rains last Summer) have reduced the supply of available brewing barley.
  • The price of malt has been so low that malting companies have been hesitant to build new plants, thus demand is currently outstripping supply (this is similar to why gas is so expensive in US.  Yes, some of it is the price of crude, but much of it is due to no new refineries having been built in US for last 20 years).
  • Agricultural commodities are going up in general due to global demand and low value of US dollar.
  • Biofuel demand is driving up the price of all grains.
  • Unfortunately, we don’t see this getting better anytime soon as the dollar is going to stay low, emerging nations will continue to adopt the western, grain based diet more and more, malting capacity will take years to be developed and to top it off Australia just had another horrible harvest.

Hops

Really, the only reason here is that there has been a global glut for decades, keeping prices so low that farmers have planted other crops or sold their farms.  In the last 20 years global hop acreage planted has fallen 50%, while beer consumption continues to go up. Demand has finally outstripped supply, and this has been exacerbated by crop failures in the last couple of years.  The hop prices should settle down in the next couple of years, although they won’t go back down to levels their previous levels.

Being a craft brewer who uses a large amount of both malt and hops in all of our beers, the price increases have dramatically affected how we manage our business and posed a difficult decision: Change recipes or raise prices?

We chose the latter because we believe in our beer and we believe that even with the recent prices increases, Flying Dog and many other craft beers remain to be a good bargain in the adult beverage industry. When compared to a good bottle of wine on a per ounce basis, the price of our beer is still quite reasonable.

We understand that this is a significant price increase and may not make sense on the surface to the end consumer, but it was a necessary move for us to merely stay in business.  By no means was it a decision driven by greed. Craft brewers need your support now more than ever if you value full
flavored beer.

I hope this has answered some of your questions.  For more information on the rising cost of malt and hops and how it is affecting the craft beer industry, I invite your you to a couple news articles that will give you a 3rd party perspective:

Story from SignOn San Diego

CNN Video

Hops Shortage documented by Fox News

[tags]flying dog, brewery, craft beer, pricing, increases[/tags]

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